Amedeo Modigliani Exhibition Opens Today at The Art and Exhibition Hall in Bonn

Amedeo Modigliani, Reclining Nude (Céline Howard), 1918, Private collection, Geneva

Amedeo Modigliani was one of the most important artists of the 20th century. His iconic works are deeply engrained in the collective pictorial memory. The Art and Exhibition Hall wants to celebrate this outstanding artist, who died tragically young at the age of only 35, with a comprehensive retrospective exhibition.

Born in Italy in 1884, Modigliani was painter, draughtsman and sculptor. With the exception of a handful of landscapes, his creative energy was entirely devoted to portraits and nudes. Modigliani’s paintings are deeply rooted in Italian art history, drawing particularly on the formal languages of the Renaissance and Mannerism. These he combined with elements from Expressionism, Cubism and Symbolism as well as African sculpture, whose perceived primitivism and iconic presence fascinated him and many avant-garde artists of the time. His work cannot be easily classified as belonging to any of the contemporary styles like Cubism or Fauvism. Yet it bears eloquent testimony to the restlessness and exuberance of an artist who was only too aware of his own vulnerability and mortality and who needed the euphoria of intoxication in order to live and work. Modigliani’s idiosyncratic, at times melancholy portraits captivate the viewer to this day.

The exhibition follows the biography of the artist and reflects the decisive turning points of his life. The Art and Exhibition Hall hopes to be able to present a representative selection of some paintings, drawings and a few sculptures from 1900 to 1919 that allows viewers to form an impression of the oeuvre of this exceptional artist.

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Published in: on April 17, 2009 at 9:43 am  Leave a Comment  
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